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National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) Soil for Water Workshop

  • Wimberley Community Center in Johnson Hall (14068 Ranch Road 12) 14068 Ranch Road 12 Wimberley, TX, 78676 United States (map)

The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment and the Cypress Creek Project are sponsoring a free National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) Soil for Water workshop on Saturday, Mar. 3, in Wimberley. Participants will learn about the relationship between upland and riparian ecosystems and how to monitor soil health across the Cypress Creek watershed.

The morning session will be from 9 AM – 12 PM at the Wimberley Community Center in Johnson Hall (14068 Ranch Road 12). The afternoon session will be held from 1 PM – 4 PM and will include a tour of the uplands and riparian areas in the Jacob’s Well Natural Area Preserve (1699 Mt. Sharp Road). Attendees are encouraged to bring water, good walking shoes and a sack lunch.

The National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) Soil for Water initiative is a program aimed at catching and holding more rainwater in soil. Healthy soil, rich in organic matter, acts like a living sponge: holding tens of thousands of gallons of water per acre and slowly releasing it to plants, springs, rivers, and aquifers. Increasing soil health makes land more resilient during drought. And when heavy rainfall occurs, more water can infiltrate before running off into our creeks and rivers.

Recent discoveries in soil science have given landowners new ways of increasing water infiltration, storing carbon in soil, improving soil health, and restoring dead soils to life. Workshop presentations will educate participants about riparian and watershed processes, the benefits of healthy riparian areas and management practices they can use to conserve and protect riparian areas. 

Seating is limited, so attendees are requested to register online at http://bit.ly/Soil4Water

Come learn how to improve the condition of your land, store more water on-site, increase biodiversity and productivity, and reduce the effects of drought and flooding. Improvements can often be seen in months or years, not millennia.